Videos

  • NOAA’s Trash Talk series of six videos explains marine debris concepts and solutions!
  • A brief, 90-second video by Chris Chow documents portions of a beach clean-up in Hong Kong. The participants appear to be collecting and documenting samples of plastic beads on a Hong Kong coastline. The video, while not in English and with no available subtitles or closed captioning, provides a first-hand look at what a beach clean-up effort may look like, and may help people planning or participating in a beach clean-up for the first time. The format of the video and simple presentation of events makes this video suitable for learners of all ages.
  • Message in the Waves: Plastics in the Ocean is a short documentary produced by Abe’s Logic detailing the issue of marine debris and its effects on wildlife and coastal environments, and can be viewed here. The documentary dedicates a large portion of itself to the plight of the wildlife of the Hawaiian islands, with special focus on the albatross, due to large levels of plastic debris being ingested by said animals. The length of the documentary, sitting at roughly 52 minutes, may not be ideal for all classroom situations and time restrictions. However, the video goes into great depth and detail on the issues presented, and is highly recommended viewing for those interested in the issue of marine debris.
  • Popular Facebook news source Now This, recently posted a brief video detailing efforts by manufacturer Bakeys to introduce edible eating utensils as a viable alternative to disposable plastic utensils. Made of rice, wheat and sorghum powders, these utensils are vegan, Kosher, organic, gluten-, GMO- and preservative-free, and are fair-trade, making them edible for almost anyone. The video also details the efficiency of producing these utensils over plastic-based utensils. At just over a minute long, the video is ideal for a brief introduction to the effects of disposable plastic utensils on the environment and their contribution to the issue of marine debris, and can be used in a variety of educational settings.
  • This news report from the BBC details the autopsy of a porpoise found dead in the Northeast Atlantic, along the UK coastline. What they found was that the animal, like nearly every other case found along the coast, had high concentrations of long-banned PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenals. These toxic chemicals were largely banned in countries around the world in the 1980s, but landfills and other waste disposal sites still contain PCB-laden products, which are now leaching their PCBs into the surrounding environment. This video, sitting at 5 minutes, is a great way to convey the effects of marine debris on the environment, and is suitable for a very wide audience. It should be noted, however, that portions of the autopsy may be considered graphic by some, so viewer discretion is advised.
  • This animated short, produced by the PEW Charitable Trusts, gives a brief, two-minute overview on the subject of Marine Debris as a part of its Ocean Terms video series. By following the above link, you can view this animation, along with any of the other Ocean Terms animations you may find interesting. At only a few minutes long each, and with available closed captioning options, these short videos are ideal for students ranging from middle and high school to college and university looking for a short introduction to the subject of marine debris, as well as the greater oceanic world.
  • The short mockumentary The Majestic Plastic Bag featuring Jeremy Irons on narration, tells the life cycle of the common plastic bag.
  • This video (Limpiando el Agua con la Pelicana Chana) commissioned by the Department of Natural and Environmental Resources in Puerto created by Rico Paco Lopez Mújica is an short animation of the character of the Pelicana Chana exploring fun ways to keep the environment clean.
  • Check out this amazing animation (Filminutos Ecologicos de Animacion Boricua) from the 1990s created to raise awareness about the importance of a clean and healthy environment. From the studios Animation Boricua in Isla Verde, Carolina – Puerto Rico.
  • This cool video details a company called ByFusion that’s reusing plastic as bricks.
  • View Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii – Cultural Inspiration to fight Plastic Pollution video here.